U.S. Role Archives

7 December 2000 – “101 Rabbis Call for Sharing Temple Mount” – The New York Times
More than 100 American rabbis have issued a statement saying that there is no religious reason to require exclusive Jewish sovereignty over the Temple Mount, the massive stone plateau in Jerusalem, considered holy by both Jews and Muslims, that has been at the center of the recent violence in the Middle East. …

7 December 2000 – “US Jewish Group Says Mount Should be Shared” – The Jerusalem Post
Washington – The Temple Mount should not remain under full Israeli sovereignty if it will prevent Israelis and Palestinians from reaching a peace deal, says a statement released yesterday by the Maryland-based Jewish Peace Lobby. …

28 January 2002 – “A New Middle East Approach: Externally Directed Separation” – The Nation
The chance for a peaceful resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is not dead. A way to reach a just, secure and internationally guaranteed compromise exists. Though the path forward
may not be easy, it is infinitely preferable to what otherwise lies ahead: a complete unraveling of the Oslo Accords, the dissolution of the Palestinian Authority and a massive escalation of death and destruction on both sides. …

17 February 2002 – “A Blueprint for a New Beginning in the Mideast” – The New York Times
COLLEGE PARK, Md.—From the beginning, the Bush administration rejected President Bill Clinton’s objective in the Middle East. America went from actively seeking to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to turning away from mediating peace negotiations to trying to manage escalating violence. Such efforts are not likely to succeed, and even if it were possible to manage the violence for a time, the world needs something more. …

14 March 2002 – “An American-imposed Peace” – Ha’aretz
Unilateral separation is a seductive notion, with serious flaws. It gives up land without getting peace in exchange. As a half-way withdrawal, it is likely to spur greater violence. A far more decisive approach is to have the United States impose, on both Israelis and Palestinians, a final territorial settlement, roughly along the lines of the Clinton parameters of December 2000. …

9 September 2002 – “A Letter to President George W. Bush”
Dear Mr. President,
The broad outlines of a solution that will end the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, open the door to a resolution of the Israeli-Arab Conflict, and bring normalization with the Arab world are clear …

Read the follow-up to this letter, “US Must Take New Role in Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.”

12 September 2002 – “President Bush Must Intervene and Offer a Peace Settlement” – Yediot
Three former ministers – Yuli Tamir, Shlomo Ben-Ami, and Amnon Lipkin-Shahak – call on president Bush to intervene in the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians and offer the sides a solution. …

12 September 2002 – “Former Ministers Invite Intervention” – Ha’aretz
Up until a little more than 18 months ago, Shlomo Ben-Ami was foreign minister, in charge of the negotiations with the Palestinians. He spent hours with them in Jerusalem, Stockholm, Washington and Taba. Amnon Lipkin-Shahak held his first meetings with Yasser Arafat and his people while Shahak was in the deputy chief of staff’s uniform. …

15 February 2003 – “US Must Take New Role in Israeli-Palestinian Conflict” – The Boston Globe
A follow-up piece to “A Letter to President George W. Bush.”
SADDAM HUSSEIN no doubt represents a major threat to peace and stability in the Middle East. Disarming him as well as creating the conditions for the emergence of an alternative regime in Baghdad are vital objectives. However, whether these objectives are reached through military action or, preferably, by peaceful means, the repercussions of the Iraqi situation on the region as a whole are bound to be many and serious. …

Summer 2004 – “Majority of Israeli Jews Prepared to Support Much Wider Unilateral Withdrawal”
Steinmetz Center for Peace Research at Tel Aviv University/University of Maryland

Polling conducted by the Steinmetz Center for Peace Research at Tel-Aviv University, in coordination with the University of Maryland, has found that a clear majority of Israeli-Jews (54.42% favor, 29.61% oppose) support a unilateral withdrawal encompassing the West Bank as well as the Gaza Strip, provided that from an international point of view, such a withdrawal ends the territorial dimension of the conflict, with Israel recognized as a Jewish state within a permanent boundary. …

Comments are closed

  • Support JPL: Empower Peacemaking

    Get Updates From JPL!